Getting to Know Mike Mahanna: Arborist, Business Owner, and Council Executive Committee Member

Mike and Dianne
Mike Mahanna with wife Dianne.

Can you tell us about your childhood influences that foreshadowed getting interested in arboriculture and urban forestry? Mike Mahanna: I grew up in the city of Utica and was always mesmerized by the American elm trees and the way they lined the city streets and formed a canopy almost appearing to touch in the middle. I spent many hours walking those streets with my family—and suddenly they were gone. At the time I had no idea it was because of Dutch elm disease, but I did miss seeing them and was saddened by the void they left and lack of beauty it created.

I also spent years as a child camping with my Dad in the Adirondack Mountains and loved everything about it. I knew at a young age that I wanted to spend most of my time outdoors.

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Christopher Anderson & the Association of Towns of the State of New York

Chris Anderson is a NYSUFC Board Member and is Director of Research for the Association of Towns of the State of New York, headquartered in Albany.

Please tell us about your background. I’m originally a Hoosier. While both of my parents came from farm families, I was raised in the second largest city in Indiana—Fort Wayne. I’ve lived in New York—Albany, Schenectady, and Schoharie counties at various times—for the last 17 years. I love New York and have no plans on leaving.

Chris Anderson

What is your personal connection to urban forestry? Whether it was the grove of American beech on my grandmother’s farm near Indianapolis or the black locust outside my window as a child in Fort Wayne, I’ve always had great affinity for trees. As a local government wonk, I’ve learned the value that urban forestry provides. What initially was aesthetic pleasure has grown to include a practical appreciation as well.

Please tell us about the Association of Towns. The Association of Towns was established in 1933 to help town obtain greater economy and efficiency. It serves town governments by providing training programs, research and information services, technical assistance, legal services, insurance programs, and a variety of educational publications to member towns.

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Getting to Know Jeremy Barrick

Jeremy Barrick is Deputy Chief of Forestry, Horticulture, and Natural Resources for the City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation and a graduate of the Municipal Forestry Institute. This is adapted from a profile of Jeremy that appeared in City TREES.

Jeremy Barrick

Jeremy, can you tell us about your education and career trajectory? Jeremy Barrick: Growing up in a small town in Minnesota that had a city forester, I have always been interested in city trees. After passing through a couple of different declared majors in college, I came to my senses and settled on my boyhood dreams of managing city trees;  who wouldn’t want to drive around town in a truck with a black lab and look at trees all day?

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Getting to Know Brian Skinner, our Council VP

Upstate NY 181Can you tell us about your childhood influences that foreshadowed getting interested in arboriculture and urban forestry, and about your education? Brian: Both my grandfathers were heavy into gardening, and I spent many a day helping them with vegetables, fruit, and flowers. My dad was active in the Boy Scouts when he grew up and continued through adulthood, so I was with him in Scouts until I went to college. I spent most of my free time at Scout camp, working in and enjoying the blessings of Mother Nature.

I spent four years at SUNY ESF and got my bachelor’s degree in Resources Management, then I spent a year and a half logging, then the past 42 years “practicing” arboriculture … and hoping to get good at it someday!

Can you tell us about your current position? As senior arborist for the upstate NY Central division of National Grid on the distribution forestry side of the business, I’m responsible for helping to manage more than 16,000 miles of overhead electric distribution lines; managing our divisional hazard tree management crews; managing our UNY community forestry commitment, including our “10,000 Trees and Growing” tree planting contribution program; and having a corporate presence by being an active member on a number of industry related professional organizations and committees (including NYSUFC).

Brian says, "Here I am at my summer desk."
Brian says, “Here I am … at my summer desk.” Brian staffs exhibits for National Grid, NYS Arborists ISA Chapter, and other organizations.

When did you first get involved with the NYSUFC, in what capacities have you served, and what has your involvement meant to you? I started by attending the 2002 annual ReLeaf conference in Brooklyn and meetings lots of interesting and unique people of like interests.  I volunteered to help out managing the financial side of the following year’s conference in Utica … and then the rest snowballed downhill from there. I ended up somehow getting involved with the executive committee, and I must have raised my hand at some point when I sneezed and was volunteered to run as VP. The rest, as they say, is history!

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Lori Brockelbank’s Tour des Trees Adventure Continues

NYSUFC Treasurer Lori Brockelbank is preparing for her second year in the STIHL Tour des Trees, a weeklong cycling event which benefits the TREE (Tree Research and Education Endowment) Fund. This year, riders will traverse Wisconsin from July 27-August 2 and will stop in Madison, Door County, Green Bay, and at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, among other places. 

Each full-Tour cyclist commits to raising $3,500 for the TREE Fund. Since 1992, the Tour has raised more than $6.6 million for tree research and education programs, making possible more than 400 TREE Fund research grants focused on arboriculture and urban forestry and the safety of the tree care workforce since 1976, along with scholarships for college students across the country.

Lori group Tour des Trees
Lori Brockelbank (second from left) with fellow Tour des Trees riders. Photo by R. Jeanette Martin

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