National Urban Forest Priorities: Your Thoughts, Please!

Screenshot 2015-01-21 14.21.00The National Urban and Community Forestry Advisory Council (NUCFAC) is seeking input on their 2016-2026 Urban Forestry Action Plan through an online survey. This is your chance to give our national urban forest leadership your opinions about what urban forest funding and program priorities should be going forward. When you go to the survey site, you will need to do a simple sign up to create an account, then you can comment.

Not yet familiar with NUCFAC? The 1990 U.S. Farm Bill created NUCFAC to advise the Secretary of Agriculture on matters relating to the protection, planting, and care of trees and forests in our nation’s cities and communities. NUCFAC brings together U&CF professionals to strategize the health and future preservation of America’s urban forests. Working together, the Council brings that a full spectrum of views into a consistent vision that is the foundation for a practical national policy on urban forestry.

Read more…

UF Must-Read: TD Bank’s Report on the Value of Toronto’s Urban Forest

 

Torontos-Urban-Forest2-600x254
photo as seen on sweetandloveable.com

One of the summer’s most widely circulated urban forestry-related stories was about the TD Bank Group’s evaluation of the economic value of Toronto’s urban forest. TD Bank Group, which acts as a think tank as well as an advisory group of economists and has a full-time environmental economist on staff, is chaired by Senior Vice President and Chief Economist Craig Alexander.

In a great interview with Alexander on the Alliance for Community Trees (ACTrees) website, he said that his group found that for every dollar of maintenance, the trees are returning between $1.35 and $3.20 (a 220% return) in benefits. Alexander says, “It’s a good investment. We aren’t including things we can’t measure like the intangibles of being able to go to a park and enjoy the trees. This is a low ball number because you can’t measure everything.”

TD Bank Group Chief Economist Craig Alexander
TD Bank Group Chief Economist Craig Alexander

It’s thrilling for City of Toronto urban foresters and indeed urban foresters everywhere to get this kind of affirmation from economists from the second largest bank in Canada (eighth largest bank in the U.S.). In their capacity as a policy think tank, Alexander said his group of economists does research on the environment and that this is the first of their reports on “natural capital.” He says, “Economics measures GDP, but there is a lot that doesn’t get measured, including the value of the environment.”

In the ACTrees article, Alexander says, “The challenge we have on public policy and environmental issues is at the end of the day, you have to have a dollars and sense argument on your investment. This kind of data also really helps politicians and government officials to make decisions. Everyone is facing fiscal constraints… we need to economically appreciate what trees do. In the aggregate the numbers are really impressive.” This is something urban foresters have known for a long time, but coming from TB Bank’s Chief Economist, it will greatly add to this awareness among the populace.

You can read the full TD Bank Group report here.
You can read a great profile of Toronto’s urban forestry program here, starting on p 10 in the July/Aug 2011 issue of City Trees.

Screenshot 2014-09-11 11.19.37

 

Ed Gilman Pruning Research Update: Reduction Pruning to Prevent Storm Damage

By Michelle Sutton
Photos courtesy of the authors of Structural Pruning: A Guide for the Green Industry (Urban Tree Foundation 2013).

Codominant stems: A bark inclusion in the union indicates there is very little, if any, wood of one stem wrapping around the other. This is one of the conditions that make unions very weak and can be avoided by appropriate structural pruning when trees are young.
Codominant stems can be avoided by appropriate structural pruning when trees are young.

Studying tree pruning and its effects on tree stability is a classic form of applied research—and can be a little lonely. “Only a few researchers are tackling pruning right now, and that can be frustrating,” says Dr. Ed Gilman, Professor of Urban Trees & Landscape Plants for the University of Florida Environmental Horticulture Department.

Gilman does Extension outreach to municipal arborists and urban foresters to teach pruning practices based on his research findings. Because he is Florida-based, Gilman is acutely aware of the need for tree pruning that enhances the tree’s ability to survive wind storms. As we in New York are experiencing increasingly bizarre weather, including tornados in places where tornados were once unheard of, Gilman’s research has application to us.

Read more…