Top Seven Blog Posts of 2017

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#1 Transplanting and a Deeper Look at “Fall Hazards”

Some topics really hold up … with nearly 1400 views, this was the top viewed blog post in 2017–even though it originally appeared in 2015! Former NYC Director of Street Tree Planting Matt Stephens and NYSUFC Editor Michelle Sutton coauthored this story questioning commonly held beliefs about “fall hazards,” mostly as it applies to B&B trees, but they also discuss the interaction of the fall season with other production methods, like bare root. Nina Bassuk helped craft the section called “The Five Branches of Transplanting Success,” which will be of interest to anyone planting trees. 

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Top Seven Blog Posts of 2016

Our Council’s blog was viewed more than 19,500 times in 2016! Here are the year’s seven most-viewed posts.

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Blight-resistant chestnut seedlings. Photo by Allen Nichols

Over a thousand people read Participate in the Reintroduction of the American Chestnut … by Simply Planting a Few Nuts. “Now comes the part of getting the blight-resistant trees into the forest. That is where you come in! We need people all over NY and in other states to plant pure wild American chestnuts so they have trees to cross with our blight-resistant tree, when it is approved for release, hopefully in the next few years.” -Allen Nichols, President of the American Chestnut Foundation, New York Chapter

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B&B trees in transport. Photo by Matt Stephens

Some blog posts resonate long past their original publication date date. Transplanting and a Deeper Look at “Fall Hazards” was one of the top five posts in 2015 and was the second most viewed post in 2016. Former NYC Director of Street Tree Planting Matt Stephens and Taking Root Editor Michelle Sutton  coauthored this story questioning commonly held beliefs about “fall hazards,” mostly as it applies to B&B trees, but they also discuss the interaction of the fall season with other production methods, like bare root. Nina Bassuk helped craft the section called “The Five Branches of Transplanting Success,” which should be of interest to anyone planting trees.

Kristy King in India
Kristy King in India

Kristy King and NYC Forest Restoration: Dreaming Big for the City’s Natural Areas Many readers wanted to learn about the work of the NYC Natural Resources Group, which manages 5,000 acres of forested natural areas across the five boroughs of NYC, and about Director of Forest Restoration Kristy King. Her dream for NYC: “… that all forested areas are dominated by native species and that invasive species have been managed to the point that natural forest regeneration is occurring and that the public holistically values the natural resources in their area.”

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Jennifer Kotary at her SUNY ESF Ranger School graduation.

NYSDEC Urban Forestry Intern Jennifer Kotary: Get to Know Her!  Many blog readers were keen to know about this dynamic up-and-comer. “My internship research involved in-depth exploration of what communities are doing to protect and build green infrastructure across the state. Via Mary’s [Kramarchyk] assigned projects, I was able to produce tangible evidence that there is quite the statewide collective will to plant and nurture an expanding canopy as well as many career and volunteer opportunities to do so.”

Rochester UFMP

From Scottsville to Long Beach: Urban Forest Master Plans, Management Plans, and Reports introduced blog readers to the growing compendium of Urban Forest plans and reports on the Council’s website. Communities creating or re-envisioning their master plans can survey what’s already been done in New York and use these plans as templates. NYS EPF (aka Cost-Share) Urban Forestry Grant funds are available for management plans or master plans, provided these plans include a specific work schedule made up of goals, tasks, and a timeline. Go to link above > Browse > DEC > 2016 Urban and Community Forestry Grants Program (Round 13)- Tree Planting or Tree Maintenance Projects.

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Zelkova ‘Musashino’ Courtesy J. Frank Schmidt & Son Co.

SMA’s 2016 Urban Tree of the Year: Musashino Zelkova generated a lot of buzz. ‘Musashino’ has been a successful and popular street tree for many more years in Japan, proving itself useful as a narrow, upright form of zelkova. It can tolerate drought and heat and is pH adaptable and pollution tolerant. See a list of all the past SMA Urban Trees of the Year here.

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Gary Raffel: Get to Know Him! Gary has served the Council in a variety of capacities, including as a board member. “I started Dynamic Tree Systems in 2002, offering general tree care service as well as Plant Health Care and Integrated Pest Management programs. I later wanted to find a niche in the industry and purchased a Tree Radar Unit at a time when there were only three of us in the U.S. and eleven people in the world using the equipment. A few years later I became the company’s international trainer, such that when a new unit was sold I would fly to the particular client and spend a week training them on their new equipment (I still do that, in addition to Dynamic Tree Systems).”

 

 

Top Five Blog Posts of 2015

Our Council blog was viewed more than 14,000 times in 2015! Here are the top five posts:

NYC Urban Forester Sumana Serchan

Sumana Serchan: Get to Know Her! Sumana Serchan is an urban forester with NYC Parks and Recreation. Sumana has a master’s degree in Environmental Management from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a bachelor’s degree in Natural Resources/Conservation from the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources (University of Vermont). She grew up in Kathmandu City, Nepal.

 

 

 

B&B trees on truck Matthew Stephens
Photo by Matt Stephens

Transplanting and a Deeper Look at “Fall Hazards” NYC Director of Street Tree Planting Matt Stephens and Taking Root Editor Michelle Sutton  coauthored this story questioning commonly held beliefs about “fall hazards,” mostly as it applies to B&B trees, but they also discuss the interaction of the fall season with other production methods, like bare root. Nina Bassuk helped craft the section called “The Five Branches of Transplanting Success,” which should be of interest to anyone planting trees.

 

 

 

 

Biotope 18: Landscape, Wireless, Tree bed > 54”A New Method for Streamlining Tree Selection in NYC  Council President and NYC Parks Senior Forester David Moore shares how the City streamlined its system for making tree species selections for 25,000 street tree plantings a year using an ingenious categorization of “biotopes.” A municipality of any size can use this article to think strategically about their tree selection process.

 

 

 

 

Ithaca UFMPIthaca’s Urban Forest Master Plan: A Template for Other Munis Looking for a template as you craft or revise your community’s urban forest master plan (UFMP)? Ithaca once again leads the way. The newly revised document includes a master plan, tree inventory data, and arboricultural guidelines.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Longtime Council President Andy Hillman (l) handed the torch to David Moore at ReLeaf 2015.

A Releaf to Remember Part I in a series of pictorials about the awesome 2015 ReLeaf Conference at SUNY ESF. Close behind was the inspiring Reflections from Incoming President David Moore

 

 

Top Seven Blog Posts of 2014

The blog and e-news incarnation of TAKING ROOT (TR) began in March of 2014. Blog entries get posted weekly, and with this one, we’re up to 45 posts. In total the TR blog has been viewed over 8000 times! Thank you to all who read the blog, write for it, share it with others, send in ideas, and those who have been game to be profiled. Here are the top seven most-viewed TR blog posts of 2014. 

David Moore: Get to Know Him! This entry set a new high bar! David shares about his work as a city forester for NYC Parks and prior position with NYRP, his connection to the North Country including his family’s woodlot in the Adirondacks, and his side career as a DJ and dance music producer.

 

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ReLeaf 2014: Horticulture at Hofstra This 240-acre campus/arboretum with more than 12,000 trees representing 625 species and varieties really knocked our socks off. This post starts off with a great interview with Hofstra Arboretum Director Fred Soviero, who gave a superb tour during our conference.

old barn foundation Craig Cramer

Nina Bassuk: Behind the Scenes in the Bassuk-Trowbridge landscape: People are naturally curious about what the nine-acre landscape of the world’s foremost street tree expert and her equally accomplished landscape architect husband is like. Hints: thousands upon thousands of bulbs; dealing with deer; capitalizing on 19th century top soil for veggies, and embracing Petasites for the wet spots. Read about it here.

Cornus amomumNew, Free UHI Guide to Woody Shrubs for Stormwater Retention: It seems this fantastic new reference, prepared by Ethan Dropkin and Nina Bassuk, is something the urban forestry community is hankering for. Includes design specs for various stormwater retention practices and a very comprehensive plant guide. Read here.

CCE Nassau County Horticulture Educator Vinnie Drzewucki

Vinnie Drzewucki on Tackling Dendrophobia/The Public’s Fear of Trees: This blog post is based on a great talk CCE Nassau County Horticulture Educator Vinnie Drzewucki gave at ReLeaf 2014. It gives great ideas for helping allay peoples’ fears. Did you know more people die from encounters with jellyfish than from tree-related incidents? Btw, it’s pronounced “Sha-VOOT-ski.”

Norway spruce by Al WegenerThe Story of BROW: Planting Street Trees Beyond the Right-of-Way–and What it Means for New Yorkers: Urban forestry consultant and BROW proponent Al Wegener gives a most interesting history of BROW, its legality, and how it might be applied in our municipalities. Read about it here.

 

Nancy Wolf in her garden with grandson Noah John, 8 1/2, and granddaughter Veronica, 4 1/2.

Getting to Know Council Founder Nancy Wolf: Lots of folks wanted to know about more about the dynamic cofounder of our Council and its prime mover and shaker for many years. Nancy was also the founding editor of TAKING ROOT. Read here about her career, education, childhood, and many interests, including her farm in Virginia.