Get to Know Him! Art Traver Edition

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Council Board Member Art Traver. Photo by Paul Maurer

Landscape architect and longtime Council Board Member Art Traver works for Wendel Companies out of their Buffalo office.  

Were there childhood influences foreshadowing your career?  
Art Traver: I think I first noticed the “environment” when I was in Boy Scouts. Our troop had their own camp in Wyoming County. My interest really kicked in when our family took over the camp property in the 80s. As we started to manage the property, I began to notice the stands of hardwoods, softwoods, and evergreens.

What has been your educational trajectory leading to arboriculture?
AT: I would say I fell into arboriculture. I worked at local nurseries and garden centers growing up. When I started college at Alfred State, I studied architecture and then civil engineering but at the time, neither of these seemed appealing enough to pursue. I took some time away from school and worked for myself in the landscape design-build world. I found my way to Niagara County Community College and received a certificate for horticulture. Getting back into school got the learning bug going, so I found myself back at Alfred State, this time in the horticulture/landscape development program. After receiving my associate’s degree from Alfred, I enrolled at SUNY-ESF for landscape architecture and received my BLA.

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The New Helen Sternberg Cutler Urban Forestry Scholarship at SUNY ESF

By Lewis M. Cutler, MS Forest Botany and Ecology, SUNY ESF, 1975

There’s now an urban forestry scholarship for students at SUNY ESF. I’ve created the Helen Sternberg Cutler Memorial Scholarship in urban forestry in my mother’s memory.

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Helen Sternberg Cutler

The urban landscape needs a lot of help to make cities more livable. With the demise of the American elm, climate change, and the spread of the emerald ash borer, I saw a need to encourage more ESF students of become professionals in urban forestry. What better way to further our family interests in urban forestry than to fund a scholarship.

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More Faces of ReLeaf

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Outgoing Council Board Member Rebecca Hargrave is Assistant Professor in the Environmental Sciences Department of SUNY Morrisville.
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SUNY ESF President Emeritus Dr. Neil Murphy took the time to give ReLeafers the fascinating backstory of the LEED Platinum Certified Gateway Center.
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Carterville Cattle Company Co-owner Alix Krueger serves on the planning board of the Town of Amboy.

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Oswego’s Mary Vanouse on ReLeaf 2015

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Mary Vanouse (right) with her daughter, Allison, under a monstrous beech tree in Mt. Auburn Cemetery in Watertown, MA.

I have recently retired from the Community Development Office in the City of Oswego and have volunteered with the Oswego Tree Stewards since its beginnings in 2009 when the group committed itself to making Oswego a Tree City USA. Since that time the Oswego Tree Stewards have diligently tackled tree pruning, planting hundreds of trees, and providing general tree care for the community. Every year we celebrate Arbor Day and have come to enjoy a good core group of dedicated volunteers.

For the first two years we began pruning trees in the City parks and since then have methodically been addressing street trees on a weekly basis for the past four years. In 2014 the City of Oswego completed its second tree inventory (Davey Tree Experts had completed Oswego’s first tree inventory in the 1930s), so it was fun to compare the old and new snapshots of the makeup of Oswego’s urban forest.

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Oswego Tree Stewards during a “Saturday on the Streets” gathering, with Phil MacArthur taking the opportunity to point out signs of a dying tree (there was fungus growing from the side of the trunk).

This year I thoroughly enjoyed the 23rd Annual Re Leaf Conference. One high point for me was the in-depth tour of the American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project that was eloquently presented by SUNY ESF Professors William Powell and Chuck Maynard and their research associates, Linda, Allison, and Tyler. Their passion for this project is contagious. I hope that many will join them in planting many thousands of “mother” chestnuts to multiply the blight resistance throughout the eastern seaboard.

I attended the Opportunities and Solutions for Green Infrastructure workshop on Friday, which was full of remarkable stories of how Onondaga County bucked the system of “gray infrastructure” after the residents protested building more wastewater plants and the newly elected Joanne Mahoney sought another solution to the runoff into Onondaga Lake. Now after many years of the “Save the Rain” campaign and a variety of partnerships with groups like Onondaga Earth Corps, Onondaga County has become a model for green infrastructure for a healthier environment. The presentation on the Gowanus Canal by Christine Petro was also a great “turnaround” story, demonstrating the benefit of citizen engagement in bringing back environmentally challenged neighborhoods.

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SUNY ESF Professor Don Leopold

The top of my list was a lightning-speed Tree ID tour presented by Professor Don Leopold of SUNY ESF. As soon as he met the group outside the Gateway Center he immediately began to talk about the varieties of trees that surrounded us. White oak, bur oak, Norway maple with milky sap, native paw paw, and the list goes on. Leopold rose to the occasion, climbing a stone wall to point out an example of invasive European buckthorn.

Large rain drops punctuated the approach to the huge dawn redwood in Oakwood Cemetery growing along the border with SUNY ESF, but the 40 members of the tour continued as Leopold explained that this is one of the oldest dawn redwoods in North America, sent to ESF in the 1950s.

Leopold pointed out a number of specimen trees at the cemetery, from sugar maple to northern cedar to London plane and bur oak. He provided a good brisk walk and a huge variety of tree identifications over the course of the afternoon, ending with distinguishing between the American and European varieties of larch, noting his preference that the American variety be planted on the ESF campus.

I would recommend the ReLeaf conference to anyone interested in improving their understanding of trees and the care of our urban forests.  —Mary Vanouse

More ReLeaf in Pictures

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CCE Onondaga Forestry Program Educator and SUNY ESF landscape architecture alumna Kim Zhang enjoyed the Gateway rooftop garden at dusk.
Council Treasurer Lori Brockelbank (center) of Wendel Companies attended ReLeaf with two students from Jamestown Community College where she teaches: Tessa Vincent (left) and Cindy Raecher (right). Cindy is serving on the Council board as a student ambassador.
Council Treasurer Lori Brockelbank (center) of Wendel Companies attended ReLeaf with two students from Jamestown Community College where she teaches: Tessa Vincent (left) and Cindy Raecher (right). Cindy is serving on the Council board as a student ambassador.
Fran Lawlor did a fantastic job as conference organizer this year, working in conjunction with the dynamic Region 7 team.
Horticulturist and educator Fran Lawlor did a fantastic job as conference organizer this year, working in conjunction with the dynamic Region 7 team.

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A ReLeaf to Remember: Part I

IMG_9330Meeting the men and women who are restoring the American chestnut, exploring the Alvar plant community on the new green roof, connecting with the Onondaga Earth Corps … there were so many highlights for the 185 attendees of the 2015 ReLeaf Conference at SUNY ESF. A special shout-out to the Region 7 folks who worked hard to put on the best program and presenters:

Kristina Ferrare, Steve Harris
Fran Lawlor, Jessi Lyons
Chris Manchester, Doug Morrison
Greg Owens, Brian “the Brain” Skinner, Pat Tobin, and Kate Woodle

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Mealtime conversations were the best! SUNY ESF graduate student Leanna Kirschen (left) works with Syracuse City Forester Steve Harris, and Tony Suave (right) works with the Onondaga Earth Corps.
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Exploring the Gateway Center green roof with beloved ESF Professor Dr. Don Leopold.

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The LEED Platinum-Certified Gateway Center: Our Home at ReLeaf 2015

Gateway CenterThe ReLeaf conference this year is in the heart of the SUNY ESF campus. The new Gateway Center, erected in 2012, surpasses qualification for its LEED platinum status with its renewable energy system, water quality and conservation systems, ecological landscaping, air quality and more. Conferees will get to tour the Center, including its green roof.

Gateway Center Energy Features:
Contains 50,000 square feet of space
Produces significantly more energy than it consumes
Features a roof-mounted solar thermal system
Houses a biomass-fueled combined heat and power system
Employs a natural ventilation system with radiant floor heating
Features lighting occupancy sensors and natural day lighting controls

An intro to the Gateway Center:

An in-depth look at the design, construction, and mission of the Gateway Center:

A quick look at the green roof:

 

 

American Chestnut Program at SUNY ESF Featured at the Upcoming ReLeaf Conference

At the 2015 ReLeaf Conference, you will have the opportunity to go behind the scenes of the SUNY ESF Chestnut Research and Restoration Project. Why is this research so critical? Why is bread mold key to the restoration of the American chestnut (Castanea dentata)? Watch these videos, and just try not to become infected with enthusiasm for this effort!

On ReLeaf Thursday, take a tour with Dr. Chuck Maynard of the laboratory and greenhouse where this groundbreaking research takes place. On Friday, hear the keynote talk from Maynard and Dr. Bill Powell, codirectors of the American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project, about restoring the American Chestnut.

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Registration Open for ReLeaf at SUNY ESF!

It’s going to be a great ReLeaf 2015! July 16-18 at SUNY ESF in Syracuse.

Program, registration form, and conference details are available now on the NYSUFC website HERE

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The theme, fitting for the conference venue, is “Environmental Science and Urban Forestry.”

Some conference highlights: 

*American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project laboratory tour and keynote talk

*Tour of SUNY ESF Gateway Center Green Roof and Illick Hall Rain Garden 

*Popular presenter Dave Nowak on Urban Forestry in a Changing Environment 

*Opportunities and Solutions for Green Infrastructure

*Onondaga Lake Ecosystem Restoration 

*Lessons from the Deer Abundance and Distribution Study in the Town of Dewitt

*Oakwood Cemetery Tree Identification

Please join us for the 23rd Annual NY ReLeaf Conference to learn, network, and connect with new friends and old! 

 

David Moore: Get to Know Him!

RELEAF 259David Moore is a city forester at the New York City Parks Department and serves on the Executive Council of our NYS Urban Forestry Council. How did he get here? What’s great and challenging about it? What are some of his other passions and interests that might surprise you?  

What were your childhood influences that foreshadowed getting interested in urban forestry? David Moore: Well, I never could have predicted that I’d be working in this field, but I always enjoyed trees and had an interest in biology. I can recall some really exciting science teachers in middle school and high school that helped spark my interest. By the time I was 12 or so, I started spending my summers at camp in the Adirondacks where I could ramble around the mountains and lakes and learn to be a real outdoorsman in all the primitive splendors of the North Country. Those experiences really laid the groundwork for my future path in forestry.

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