Yale Forest Forum Webinar Series on The Promise and Practice of Community-Based Forestry

 

Click here to see the full roster of talks and to register

The Yale Forest Forum (YFF) has a free spring speaker series underway, hosted by The Forests Dialogue and the Urban Resources Initiative, on The Promise and Practice of Community-Based Forestry. Join the series every Thursday through April 29 from 11:30am-12:10pm ET. (Note that there will be no webinar on April 8.) YFF talks are free and open to the public.

This Thursday, February 18th, Yale School of the Environment URI GreenSkills Manager Caroline Scanlan presents on “A University Model for Clinical Urban Community Forestry Training.” You can read about Caroline’s work in her recently published paper in Arboriculture & Urban Forestry.

More about the series:

Community-based forestry intends to create pathways for local people to have decision-making control of forest management. The key strategy of community-based forestry is to equitably empower all local stakeholders through a long-term, landscape-based, and inclusive approach to supporting local communities to secure their land and resource rights, stop deforestation, find alternative livelihoods, and foster gender equity.

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Creating More Equitable Urban Forests by Understanding and Responding to Historical Trauma

The author, Christine Carmichael (far left), with a group of volunteers at a street tree-planting event in Detroit, Michigan in 2015. All photos courtesy of the author.

Creating More Equitable Urban Forests by Understanding and Responding to Historical Trauma

By Christine E. Carmichael, Ph.D., Founder and Principal, Fair Forests Consulting, LLC

For the last couple of decades, research documenting inequitable urban forest coverage by race and income in the United States has grown. Far from being an issue relegated to one city or region in the U.S., it is now clear that whiter and wealthier neighborhoods across the country have more tree canopy coverage than neighborhoods with predominately non-white residents and those with lower median income.[1] [2] [3]

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Beattra Wilson’s Steadfast Path: An Urban Forestry & USDA Forest Service Journey

Beattra Wilson opened the 2018 Partners in Community Forestry Conference in Irvine, California with her plenary presentation.

A Steadfast Path: My Urban Forestry and USDA Forest Service Journey

By Beattra Wilson, Photos Courtesy of the Author

Beattra Wilson began her career with the USDA Forest Service in 2002 in Atlanta as an urban forestry trainee; she is now the Forest Service Assistant Director of Cooperative Forestry and National Lead for Urban and Community Forestry. We asked Beattra to share some of her educational and career trajectory and what excites her about her work. Here she is in her own words.

I grew up surrounded by pine forests in a small town in Louisiana called Oakdale. I was introduced to agriculture education and career opportunities beginning in fourth grade through my involvement with 4-H. I competed at the parish and statewide fairs in the 4-H Sew with Cotton and Public Speaking contests.

Those 4-H experiences helped propel me to hold leadership roles in high school. I also had a pivotal experience at a summer agricultural camp at Southern University and A&M College, a historically black college and university (HBCU) system, where I learned in depth about urban forestry and other agriculture professions. (This summer agriculture institute continues to serve 40-50 students each summer, and the Forest Service is a supporting partner.)

The summer Beginning Agricultural Youth Opportunities Unlimited (BAYOU) Program at Southern University provides high school students an immersion in career opportunities in agriculture, family and consumer sciences, and related disciplines.

As I was looking into college degree programs, based on my test scores and GPA I was recruited by two colleges for urban forestry and agriculture economics and five colleges for engineering. Ultimately, I chose to study urban forestry because it seemed like a perfect merger of my deep connection to agriculture along with my desire to have a career that afforded me the opportunity to live in a big city.

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