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2018 Arbor Day Grant Application Period Open!

2018 Arbor Day Community Grant Notice

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Pat Evens

The NYS Urban Forestry Council is pleased to announce available funding for small communities to have a 2018 Arbor Day tree planting event and to establish a community based forestry program. This funding has been provided by the USDA Forest Service and the NYS DEC Urban Forestry Program (and is not associated with the Arbor Day Foundation nor is part of the NYSDEC EPF community grants program).

Grants of up to $1,000 will be awarded to communities or non-profits (that work in partnership with communities) to celebrate Arbor Day 2018 by both planting a tree (or trees)and forming a volunteer tree committee or tree board within the municipality.  To be considered for a grant, please complete and return the application and requested documentation (PDF format) (Word format here).

Besides planting trees, the intent of this grant is to help promote and establish a meaningful community forestry program. Communities that are currently a Tree City USA or those that have any component of the Tree City USA program, such as a tree ordinance, tree board, tree inventory or management plan are ineligible. Previous NYS Arbor Day Community Grant recipients are also ineligible. 

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Behind the Scenes with Arbor Day Poster Contest Winner

Sarah at Arbor Day ceremony
from left: Sarah Werner, 2017 winner of the statewide 5th grade Arbor Day poster contest; Warwick Mayor Michael Newhard; and Patricia Reinhardt, chair of the Arbor Day Committee and a member of Warwick Valley Gardeners. Photo by Denise Werner

Last spring, many students from the Warwick Valley Central School District took part in the 2017 Arbor Day Ceremony on April 28th at Stanley-Deming Park, co-hosted by the Village of Warwick and Warwick Valley Gardeners. Among them was fifth grader Sarah Werner, whose artwork on the theme of “Defend New York’s Forests” was chosen as the statewide Arbor Day poster contest winner. We talked with Sarah and her Mom, Denise, about this achievement and about their personal connection with trees.

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Sarah: When I saw the theme ‘Defend New York’s Forests’, I thought of a fantasy where the forest had a shield, like a knight protecting the forest. The forest is behind the shield, but different kinds of trees are featured in front of it. My Mom taught me how to paint trees. I’ve been into art since I was very little, where I started with finger painting. My favorite trees are the maples because of all their fall colors. Trees always calm me. They put me in a peaceful mind place.

Denise: Since Sarah was a baby, my husband and I have taken her hiking in the forest near us, Wawayanda State Park. From six months old on she was out there in a backpack with us. Also since Sarah learned to walk, she helped me water newly planted spruce trees around the property. Those experiences influenced her awareness of trees and why trees are good for the environment. 

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Save the Rain’s Latest Tree Planting Involves 188 Volunteers in Syracuse

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Volunteers planting in the Brighton Neighborhood of Syracuse. Photos Courtesy Save the Rain 

From Clare Evelyn Carney, CCE Onondaga Urban Forestry Educator:

The Save the Rain (STR) Tree Planting Program had a wonderful year of planting street trees throughout the City of Syracuse. In 2017, over 1,000 trees were planted through the collaborative efforts of Cornell Cooperative Extension of Onondaga County, the City of Syracuse Parks Department, and the Onondaga Earth Corps (OEC). This fall season, Save the Rain (STR) team members participated in a neighborhood restoration project and two tree planting events in which volunteers engaged with their communities.

On September 14th, 2017 the STR team came together to support the annual Home HeadQuarters Block Blitz. It was a wonderful opportunity to partner with other organizations working to rejuvenate our communities. The Block Blitz is a volunteer event focused on the revitalization of homes in Syracuse, with interventions such as painting, landscaping, cleanups, and structural restoration. As part of the landscape renewal, the STR crew planted 13 trees at properties in the Southside Neighborhood. 

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A Happy Tale from the Community Benefit Tree Program of the ALB Reforestation Project

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Photo by Pete Cheswick

by Addie Cappello, Horticulture Assistant, CCE Nassau County

As part of the ongoing Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Reforestation Grant, we ALB project staff (Nick Bates, Rob Calamia, and Addie Cappello) entered the fall 2107 planting season excited to be out of the office and back to working outdoors. For the third consecutive season, we were undertaking the entire tree project—from planning to planting—without the assistance of outside contractors. We are proud of the skills, knowledge, and self-sufficiency we have built up over time.

As part of the ongoing Community Benefit Tree Program of the ALB project, we had planned to plant 50 public trees within the Town of Oyster Bay in fall of 2017. These trees would be planted within the grounds of three schools located in the Massapequa School District: Massapequa High School, Unqua Road Elementary School, and Eastlake Elementary School. We worked closely with the grounds manager for the district, Pete Cheswick, who helped us locate ideal spots for new trees, while we selected appropriate species. Planting went well and we were happy to have helped a community as well as further our goal of reforesting Long Island. 

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Memorial Park as Urban Arboretum: White Haven in Pittsford

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The oldest and largest tree at White Haven, a majestic red oak (Quercus rubra).

The tree collections of cemeteries and memorial parks make a significant contribution to urban forests. Recently we learned more about the Certified Level 2 urban arboretum that is Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn as part of the blog profile of Green-Wood Director of Horticulture and Curator Joseph Charap. White Haven Memorial Park in Pittsford is a Certified Level 1 Arboretum, soon to be applying for Level 2 Certification.

The 170-acre White Haven Memorial Park in Pittsford is a park for all people. Walkers and runners are welcome, bicyclists and hikers are welcome, dogs are welcome. Birders can come do their early morning thing, including observing Eastern bluebirds in the Park’s dedicated nesting area. The entrance sign even says “Geocachers welcome.” One need not have a loved one buried there to enjoy the beautiful natural assets of White Haven—including formidable horticultural assets.

There are more than 150 different tree species in the developed areas alone, with dozens more species yet to be inventoried in the Park’s 70-plus acres of forest. The oldest and largest tree is a red oak (Quercus rubra) in the center of the developed Park. Director of Horticulture Gary Burke is partial to a large shagbark hickory (Carya ovata) and Park President Andrea Vittum loves the large Nootka cypress (Cupressus nootkatensis).

Other interesting specimens include Kentucky coffeetree (Gymnocladus dioicus), Katsura tree (Cercidiphyllum japonicum), Japanese snowbell (Styrax japonicus), tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica), yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea), American fringetree (Chionanthus virginicus), goldenchain tree (Laburnum anagyroides), paperbark maple (Acer griseum), and six different kinds of beech trees. There are five mature ash trees in the developed collection that are being micro-injected to project the trees from Emerald Ash Borer. Newly planted trees get trunk protection via corrugated plastic tubes, to protect the tender cambium from rutting bucks. 

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Urban Forest Ecology: Earthworms Implicated in Sugar Maple Decline

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Dr. Tara Bal examining earthworm activity in leaf litter.

Whoa. Worms can cause a lot of problems, as we’ve been exploring on the blog with regard to the organic matter over-consumer, Asian jumping worm. A Michigan Tech study entitled “Evidence of damage from exotic invasive earthworm activity was highly correlated to sugar maple dieback in the Upper Great Lakes region” points to … just that. That is, the way in which earthworms (which, due to glacial scraping in the past, are not native in Michigan or in New York) are directly and indirectly contributing to or causing maple decline, which has affected urban forests as well as exurban ones.

Michigan Tech did a great summary of the research and here is the abstract for the study, published in the journal Biological Invasions. The lead author is Dr. Tara Bal, who wrote her dissertation about sugar maple decline in the Upper Great Lakes Region.

Abstract

Sugar maple (Acer sacharrum Marsh.) in the western Upper Great Lakes region has recently been reported with increased crown dieback symptoms, prompting investigation of the dieback etiology across the region. Evaluation of sugar maple dieback from 2009 to 2012 across a 120 plot network in Upper Michigan, northern Wisconsin, and eastern Minnesota has indicated that forest floor disturbance impacts from exotic invasive earthworms was significantly related to maple dieback. Other plot level variables tested showed significant relationships among dieback and increased soil carbon, decreased soil manganese, and reduced herbaceous cover, each of which was also be correlated to earthworm activity. Relationships between possible causal factors and recent growth trends and seedling counts were also examined. Maple regeneration counts were not correlated with the amount of dieback. The recent mean radial increment was significantly correlated with various soil features and nutrients. This study presents significant evidence correlating sugar maple dieback in the western Upper Great Lakes region with earthworm activity, and highlights the need for considering the impacts of non-native earthworm on soil properties when assessing sugar maple health and productivity.

Drones in the Urban Forest, Part 2: The Potential

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Drone making visual tree inspection. Photo by Dan Staley

In Remote Sensing and Assessment of Urban Forests with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles from the Jan/Feb 2017 issue of City Trees, author and UAVs (drones) expert Dan Staley defines terms and lays out the potential uses of this rapidly evolving technology for urban forestry inspections. He explains “how UAVs can be used for remote sensing of urban forests for risk assessment, visual inspections, pest detection, inventory data enhancement, and rapid response after disasters, among other tasks.” 

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Drones in the Urban Forest, Part 1: NYSDEC’s Drone Program Takes Off

NYSDEC is now using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs, also known as drones) for a variety of monitoring purposes around the State. This terrific video, followed by the official NYSDEC press release, shows you the projects undertaken thus far. The ones that will perhaps interest the NYS urban forestry community most are related to Southern Pine Beetle and Phragmites–but all the projects are fascinating. In the next post, we explore the potential uses for urban forestry.

DEC’s Drone Program Takes Off

Fleet of 22 Drones and Professional Operators Undertake Critical Search and Rescue, Forest Fires, Wildlife Management and Forest Health Missions

DEC Drones Dispatched to Assist in Hurricane Recovery Efforts in Texas and Puerto Rico

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced today that the agency has deployed a fleet of 22 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or “drones,” across the state to enhance the state’s environmental management, conservation and emergency response efforts. 

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Onondaga Tree Planting Includes ROW Sites in Dewitt

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Volunteers powered 2017 fall bare root tree planting in municipalities across Onondaga County. Photos Courtesy CCE Onondaga County

From Clare Carney, Natural Resource Educator for CCE Onondaga County:

This year, as part of an Onondaga County Community Development Block Grant, CCE Onondaga worked with multiple municipalities to coordinate volunteer tree plantings. One of the five communities to host the tree plantings in 2017 was the Town of DeWitt. Working with Town Naturalist Christine Manchester and her dedicated team of Tree Committee volunteers, we were able to secure homeowner-approved sites for ten trees to be planted in the right-of-way. Some homeowners joined in the tree planting, which took place on October 21st.

Manchester says, “The Town of Dewitt does seek resident approval prior to planting even in rights-of-way. It has been our experience that residents view this property as private because they mow it and there are very few sidewalks in the Town marking the boundary between private and public properties. We hope that one day, trees and sidewalks will both be treated as any other infrastructure and installed regularly in Town rights-of-way.”

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Town Naturalist Christine Manchester and volunteers got homeowner approval to plant trees in the right of way.

The other municipalities that participated in the 2017 Community Development tree plantings were the Town of Geddes, Village of Solvay, Town of Camillus, and Village of Baldwinsville. They planted in parks and public areas, so homeowner approval didn’t come into play. A total of 50 bare root trees were planted across the County by 60 volunteers of all ages attending the tree planting events. It was a wonderful season of community involvement and participation to support the renewal of urban forest canopy, green infrastructure, and environmental stewardship.