2020 ReLeaf Conference in Buffalo Rescheduled for 2021

 

In case you missed the announcement in May’s TAKING ROOT news

From President Karen Emmerich

Sadly, due to the pandemic, we had to cancel the 2020 ReLeaf conference scheduled for July 23-25th in Buffalo. But the good news is that the Region 9 ReLeaf group has agreed to host the conference next summer, so put July 22-24th, 2021 on your calendar. We don’t want all their hard work to be in vain. It’s disappointing, but I think it’s the right decision.

I know many people had to postpone or cancel their Arbor Day celebrations, but in my town, we’re going to focus on an Arbor Week celebration in November. We’re all trying to make the best of a tough situation, so we have to be creative. As things open up in the months ahead, I hope we can re-establish our regional meetings/workshops. But until then, please stay safe and take time to smell the flowers.

Green-Wood Cemetery “Zooming in on Nature” Series

Photo Credit: Art Presson

Join Green-Wood staff and their research collaborators on Zoom on four Fridays: May 15, May 22, May 29, and June 5 from noon to 1 p.m. to learn about urban grasslands, veteran trees, common mushrooms, and wild bees at Brooklyn’s storied Green-Wood. Free; simple registration for each program.

Zooming in on Urban Grasslands at Green-Wood

Zooming in on Veteran Trees

Zooming in on Identifying Common Mushrooms

Zooming in on Wild Bees: Behavior at Habitat

 

 

DEC Announces 2020 Fifth Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest Winner

child's drawing of an apple tree

Last month, NYSDEC Commissioner Basil Seggos announced the winner of DEC’s Annual 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster Contest – Nicole Halaseh from Casimir Pulaski School in Yonkers, Westchester County.

“This year’s 5th grade Arbor Day Poster Contest winner Nicole Halaseh’s unique artwork captures the importance of New York’s official State fruit, the apple, and how it’s both a healthy food source and a valuable part of New York’s economy,” said Commissioner Seggos. “DEC thanks all the students who participated in this creative demonstration of the many ways trees contribute to our lives.”

Each year, hundreds of fifth graders across the state compete in designing an educational and eye-catching poster focused on a theme that honors trees. The 2020 poster theme is “Trees Feed New York,” giving students the opportunity to learn about the dozens of ways both humans and wildlife rely on trees as a food source.

The annual 5th Grade Arbor Day Poster contest is announced in September and runs through December. New York State teachers, schools, and clubs that wish to participate in the next contest round should visit DEC’s website for more information.

Were you involved in Earth Day or Urban Forestry 1970-1993?

NANCY WOLF SEEKS INFORMATION ABOUT URBAN FORESTRY ACTIVITY AROUND THE STATE

Nancy Wolf is writing a short history of urban forestry in New York State from the earliest days of the late 19th century through today’s successful program.

Archival materials have not been systematically collected, unfortunately, but she is in touch with many who have been active in the program and they are pleased to share memories and any information they have.

She would like anyone to let her know information, particularly the following:

1.  Were there any “tree groups” or environmental organizations that celebrated the original Earth Day in 1970?

2.  Did any “tree groups” or environmental groups work with DEC in the early days of urban forestry from 1978 through 1991?  She would like details about this period, particularly. The Urban Forestry Coordinators during this period were Carl Wiedemann and Peter Innes.

3.  What “tree groups” are there now that are doing local urban forestry work, either on their own or in cooperation with local and state agencies?

4.  She would like details of the planning groups that were created by the expansion of New York ReLeaf in the early 1990’s. Many of the materials of that time have disappeared.

If you have memories or other information, please write to Nancy at jlnwolfinc@aol.com or call her at 718-834-4589.

Thanks!  

2020 Community Resilience Grants for Tree City USA Communities

News from the Arbor Day Foundation

2020 Bank of America Community Resilience Grant Application is Now Live!

For existing Tree City USA communities 

Applications due Feb 21, 2020

From ADF:

Thank you for your continued dedication to the health of your community forest and participation in the Tree City USA program. We want to make you aware of a special grant opportunity focused on community resilience, available exclusively for recognized Tree City USA communities. The deadline for application is February 21st, 2020 – read on to learn more and apply. 

Read more…

Top Five NYSUFC Blog Posts of 2019

#1 Transplanting and a Deeper Look at “Fall Hazards”

Encore! Encore! Originally published on the blog in 2015, this post continues to be highly relevant to our blog readers; in the lifetime of the post, it’s been viewed more than 5300 times. Former NYC Director of Street Tree Planting Matt Stephens and NYSUFC Editor Michelle Sutton coauthored this story questioning commonly held beliefs about “fall hazards,” mostly as it applies to B&B trees, but they also discuss the interaction of the fall season with other production methods, like bare root. Nina Bassuk helped craft the section called “The Five Branches of Transplanting Success,” which will be of interest to anyone planting trees.

Read more…

Underutilized Trees for Urban Use: Chinese Fringe Tree

Chinese fringe tree (Chionanthus retusus) foliage is darker, glossier, rounder, and more leathery than native fringe tree (C. virginicus) foliage, and its flower petals have rounded ends and appear less feathery than those of the native tree. Photo by Bill Haws

There’s some disagreement about the true native (vs. naturalized) range of white fringe tree, Chionanthus virginicus. Although it appears to be indigenous to the Southeast U.S. at least, the potential planting range of this small tree, hardy to USDA Zone 3, is the entire continental U.S. Unfortunately, white fringe tree has been found to be quite vulnerable to Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) like its Oleaceae family cousins, ash trees.

Young Chinese fringe tree habit and showy bloom. Chinese fringe tree can be grown as a standard in tree form, with a mature height and width range of 15 to 25 feet. Photo by Bill Haws

Interestingly, Chinese fringe tree (Chionanthus retusus) has not been found to be vulnerable to EAB. It’s thought that since C. retusus co-evolved with EAB, this Asian iteration of fringe tree built up defenses to the beetle over millennia in its native eastern Russia, northern China, Japan, and Korea.

Read more…