Not Yet a Tree City USA? Apply by Feb 26 for 2021 NYSUFC Quick Start Grant to Help You Get There

The NYS Urban Forestry Council is pleased to announce available funding for communities to hold a 2021 Arbor Day tree planting event and to establish a community-based forestry program. Communities can apply for up to $1,000. Funding has been provided by the USDA Forest Service.  INFO AND BRIEF APPLICATION PACKET

Grant Goals:

The intent of this grant is to help municipalities establish a community forestry program and move toward becoming a Tree City USA Community. Tree City USA is a program of the Arbor Day Foundation. Please note that this Quick Start Grant is not associated with the Arbor Day Foundation nor is it part of the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program funded by the NYS Environmental Protection Fund.

Eligibility:
Communities are eligible if they intend to work toward Tree City status but are lacking any of the components of the Tree City USA program. The four components include having a tree ordinance, a tree board, $2/capita budgeted for trees, and an annual Arbor Day celebration. Definitions and details of those components can be found on the Tree City USA website.

Eligible projects include:
• planting trees (see the recommended resources listed in this notice to facilitate tree species selections to support urban forestry species diversity)
• holding an Arbor Day ceremony (does not have to be on the official Arbor Day which is the last Friday in April – April 30th for 2021) but please plan for a spring event

Eligible expenses may include but are not limited to trees, mulch, soil, printing of a program, advertising to publicize the event.
Communities that are currently a Tree City USA or are a recipient of previous NYS Urban Forestry Council Arbor Day Community Grants are ineligible.

Applications are due (postmarked) by 5pm on February 26, 2021. 🌳

2021 Quick Start Grant Application Package

Watertown Utilizes DEC Grant for Tree Planting & EAB Treatment

Thank you to City of Watertown Planner and Council Board Member Mike DeMarco for providing this summary and photos. 

In October 2018, the City of Watertown was awarded a $20,250 tree planting grant through the New York State (NYS) Department of Environmental Conservation’s (DEC) Urban and Community Forestry Grant Program. Watertown City Planning staff utilized data found in the City’s recently completed tree inventory and management plan to easily identify available planting sites for the 2019 DPW Bare-Root Tree Planting Project.

2019 DPW Tree Planting Project

  • 55 bare-root trees purchased – DEC funded
  • 73 bare-root trees purchased – City funded (includes 25% City match)

Read more…

Community Tree Recovery Grants through Arbor Day Foundation

Community Tree Recovery Program: “Tell us about your 2021 tree needs!”

Have questions? Please contact Lachel Bradley-Williams at lbradley-williams@arborday.org.

The Community Tree Recovery program is designed to help support canopy recovery for those experiencing tree loss caused by wildfires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and invasive pest species. This work is essential for re-establishing neighborhood trees, public green spaces, homeowner’s back yards and most critically, building a greater sense of community support and wellbeing. In this space, trees serve as a symbol of collective growth, hope and healing.

To date, more than 5 million trees have been planted and distributed across the globe through the Community Tree Recovery program. During each recovery project, our team works closely with highly valued local forestry partners on the ground to help organize events, ensuring right tree – right place – right time. Whether you are a State Coordinator, local Non-profit, regional Forester, City Parks and Recreation or local Garden Club, we want to hear from you!

We invite you to learn more about Community Tree Recovery online and explore the T.R.E.E. Proposal. In order to be eligible for financial support you must submit at least one project proposal. While not a guarantee of sponsorship, this is your opportunity to share how you plan to make a difference in your community through the power of trees. Paint a vivid picture to help us to tell your story and advocate for your local tree needs. If ever there were a time for trees, the time is now.

 

Town of Bedford Plants “Generation Oak” with Council Grant Support

Planting the swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor) they’ve named the “Generation Oak,” the Town of Bedford celebrates the legacy that tree planting leaves for future generations, and gives a delightful nod to Star Trek Next Generation.

Town of Bedford Conservation Board Chair Simon Skolnik said, “A healthy swamp white oak can live for up to 300 years. That puts its old age into the 24th Century. To put that into context, that will be the century that Star Trek’s Captain Jean-Luc Picard takes the Starship Enterprise ‘Where no one has gone before.’ That expression, ‘where no one has gone before’ is a perfect segue into why we are calling this swamp white oak the ‘Generation Oak.’ Our generation, the adults standing here today, have planted it. We will nurture it. Water it. Watch out for any disease, and will prune and treat it. If it is to grow and flourish, it will need the help and care of the generations represented today by our children and our grandchildren, and then their children and their grandchildren, and then their children and grandchildren.”

The Town of Bedford in Westchester County was awarded a tree grant on September 23, 2020, from the New York State Urban Forestry Council under our program to celebrate those communities that have been a Tree City USA for at least 5 years, and to support their on-going community street tree and forestry programs.

Read more…

TD Green Space Grant Application Now Open! – $20,000 US


Applications are now being accepted for the TD Green Space Grants program, a collaboration of TD Bank Group and the Arbor Day Foundation aimed at supporting vibrant, sustainable, and healthy North American cities through the strategic development and enhancement of green spaces and natural areas.

TD Green Space Grants will offer North American municipalities in support of creative programs and projects that use green infrastructure development, tree planting, forestry stewardship, and community green space expansion as a way to advance environmental and economic benefits toward a low-carbon economy. The 2021 theme for the program is, “Building Resilience: Green infrastructure solutions for communities disproportionally impacted by Covid-19. (Defining communities disproportionately impacted as: seniors, low-income families and individuals, Black, Indigenous and racialized communities, and individuals experiencing homelessness.)

To be eligible for a TD Green Space Grant, your project must take place within TD’s footprint in the United States or Canada, with priority being given to projects in areas that primarily serve low- to moderate-income residents or take place in underserved communities.

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Beacon’s Fall Planting with Aid of Council Grant

Photo and Text Courtesy of Beacon Recreation Director Mark Price

The Beacon Tree Committee, with the help of the Department of Public Works, planted trees in celebration of Fall and future shade at the South Ave Park Basketball Court on Friday, November 6.

Three specimen-size red maples (Acer rubrum) were planted for their fall color, shade, and year-round handsomeness. Red maple has the greatest north-south distribution of all tree species along the East Coast, ranging from eastern Canada south to Florida and west to east Texas. This popular ornamental tree grows 40-60 ft. in cultivation, occasionally reaching 100-120 ft. in the wild.

The City of Beacon wants to thank the NYS Urban Forestry Council and their Tree City USA Reward Grant program for the award of $1,000 in funding for our tree planting project.

North Tonawanda’s Joyful Tree Planting, Assisted by Council Grant

Super video from North Tonawanda about their recent planting event aided by a Tree City USA Reward Grant from our Council. Starting at the 3:02 mark you get to see the planting in action.

Director at North Tonawanda Department of Youth, Recreation, Parks & Seniors Alex Domaradzki says, “Special thanks to The New York State Urban Forestry Council for awarding the grant, and for Mayor Art Pappas, Alderman Bob Pecoraro, Derek Anthony, Mike Lorenc, Sam McCabe, and Lily Domaradzki for helping with the plantings!”

Congrats to North Tonawanda Parks and Recreation!

2021 Community Resilience Grants: App is “Short & Straightforward”

Here’s an opportunity to use community forestry best management practices as a way to reduce disaster impacts and mitigate climate change. To build resilience!

The National League of Cities 2021 Leadership in Community Resilience program is now accepting proposals from cities seeking additional funding for resilience-related projects. Each city selected for the 2021 cohort will receive $10,000 in financial support, and customized support from both NLC and the Resilient Cities Network (formerly 100RC). Apply today! The deadline for applications is December 23th, 2020. The announcement says, “We know how cumbersome and time consuming applications and proposal writing can be, so we purposely designed this one to be short and straightforward.”

  • Cities and towns with a population of 5,000 or more are encouraged to apply.
  • Lead applicant must be a municipal government, represented by a department head, other city staff, or elected official (mayor, council member, commissioner, etc.).
  • Local nonprofits and community-based organizations may apply in partnership with a city.

Washington Square Park Eco Projects & Co-founder Georgia Silvera Seamans

Georgia Silvera Seamans (center) with the interactive Washington Square Park Eco Projects Mobile Exhibit. Photo Courtesy Street Lab

Georgia Silvera Seamans is the co-founding director of Washington Square Park Eco Projects in New York City. She is an urban forester, independent researcher, and writer. Georgia has bylines with UrbanOmnibus.netAudubon.org, and Audubon Magazine, and her research has been published in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening and the former Journal of Arboriculture. Georgia blogs about urban nature at localecologist.org. She holds degrees from Wesleyan University, the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, and UC Berkeley.  

Could you share about your NYC roots and your connection to Washington Square Park in particular?

Georgia Silvera Seamans: When my family emigrated to the U.S., the first place we landed was Washington Heights. I attended junior high and high school in NYC. I used to visit the Village as a teenager; the vintage shops on West 8th Street were fun to explore! I recall one visit to Washington Square Park during that time. The Park struck me as a dynamic and diverse place. As an adult I moved back to the City in 2009. I live a few blocks from the Park, within a 10-minute walk.

A view from within WSP to the iconic Washington Arch. The nearby crabapple trees feed many bird species in the fall, including catbirds and hermit thrushes. Photo by the author.

How did you come to urban forestry, and what have been some of your peak experiences along the way? Could you talk about your urban forestry research and writing? 

GSS: I became an urban forester because of my job as a paid community forestry intern with the Urban Resources Initiative in New Haven, Connecticut. This practical experience more than any academic training set me on the urban forestry path. I was an intern in the organization’s Community Greenspace program where I provided technical resources to seven community groups in the Newhallville neighborhoods.

The projects undertaken by the groups I worked with ranged from planting street trees on a block to converting an abandoned house lot into a bird sanctuary. I can honestly say that but for this rigorous and fun experience I would not have applied to and been offered the job as urban forester for the City of Boston.

I returned to graduate school after working for the Boston Parks and Recreation Department for a few years. At UC Berkeley, my dissertation research was focused on how and why municipal agencies and nonprofits were reframing trees as ecological agents versus the conventional aesthetic narrative. I am proud of my first authored paper based on my dissertation which was published in 2013 in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.

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Council Offers New “Tree City USA Reward Grant”

Michelle Sutton

Deadline to Apply is 09/14/20

The NYS Urban Forestry Council is pleased to announce grants for communities to plant large specimen trees or a grove of trees in a prominent location within the community. Full Details, Application, and Contact Info

Communities in New York State that have been a Tree City USA for at least the past five years can apply for up to $1,000. Funding has been provided by the New York State Urban Forestry Council.

Grant Goals

The intent of this grant is to encourage municipalities to sustain their community forestry program and maintain their status as a Tree City USA Community through a celebratory tree planting.

Read more…